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DHS Research Areas within the Science and Technology Directorate

 

 

Advanced Data Analysis & Visualization: information extraction, knowledge management, and visualization of large quantities of data to enhance data fusion, situational awareness, and threat detection. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Health Sciences, Mathematics, and Psychology.

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Biological Threats & Countermeasures: assessment, characterization and prioritization of chemical-biological threats; detection and warning systems; agro-defense and food security; biological countermeasures; and decontamination, restoration and medical response to biological threat events. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Biology, Veterinary Science, Emergency Medicine, Chemistry, Agriculture, Computer Science, Economics, Engineering, Health Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Planetary Science.

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Border Security: technologies to monitor and inspect cargo that cross our land, maritime borders and ports of entry; tools to monitor people who cross our land, maritime borders and ports of entry; evaluation of the policies and procedures designed to secure the border while welcoming legitimate visitors and trade. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Computer Science, Engineering, Social Science, and Aeronautics.

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Chemical Threats & Countermeasures: assessment, characterization and prioritization of chemical-biological threats; detection and warning systems; agro-defense and food security; chemical countermeasures; and decontamination, restoration and response to chemical threat events. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS research area: e.g. Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Materials Engineering/Science, Biochemistry, and Meteorology.

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Communications & Interoperability: interoperable communication for emergency responders. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Engineering.

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Community, Commerce & Infrastructure Resilience: multidisciplinary research to develop approaches to improve community resilience across the United States, improving community resilience and determining ways where public investments can foster resilient communities. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS research area: e.g. Economics, Social Sciences, Psychology, Public Health, Urban Planning, Environmental Studies, and Engineering.

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Emergency Preparedness & Response: decision support tools to aid in the preparation or response to catastrophic events; studies of public risk communication; medicine and public health; business technology for first-responders. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Computer Science, Economics, Engineering, Physics and Quantitative Political Science.

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Explosives Detection, Mitigation, & Response: the detection, mitigation, and response to explosives in a wide variety of contexts. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Chemistry, Engineering, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics, and Social Sciences.

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Food & Agriculture Security: assessment, characterization and prioritization of chemical-biological threats; detection and warning systems; agro-defense and food security; biological or chemical countermeasures; and decontamination, restoration and medical response to biological or chemical threat events. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Agriculture, Bio-Chem, Epidemiology, Veterinary Science, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Planetary Science, and Health Sciences.

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Human Factors: integration of human factors concerns into homeland security technologies to improve utility and operator safety; assessments of public acceptance of homeland security technologies; use of technology to discern critical aspects of human behavior. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Computer Science, Engineering, Health Sciences, Psychology, and Social Sciences. 

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Immigration Studies: studies of the integration of new immigrants into U.S. society and the consequences of successful/failed assimilation. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Computer Science, Economics, Social Science, and Political Science.

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Infrastructure Protection: assessment of relative threats and vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure; estimation of consequences of natural disasters or terrorist attacks to critical infrastructure; application of engineering technologies or tools to enhance DHS’ ability to prepare, predict, and minimize or prevent damage to critical infrastructure from natural hazards. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Computer Science, Economics, Engineering, Physics, Meteorology, Oceanography, Hydrology, Marine Science, and Business Administration.

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Maritime & Port Security: technologies and tools to secure national maritime borders and U.S. maritime interests, support global maritime awareness, defend maritime commerce and global supply chains, minimize damage and expedite recovery from attacks or catastrophic events impacting maritime interests, and protect coastal population centers. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Economics, Chemistry, Operations Research, Computer Science and Engineering, Maritime Engineering and Shipping Supply Chain (MBA), Maritime Meteorology, Remote Sensing.

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Natural Disasters & Related Geophysical Studies: assessment of relative threats and vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure; estimation of consequences of natural disasters or terrorist attacks to critical infrastructure; application of engineering technologies or tools to enhance DHS’ ability to prepare, predict, and minimize or prevent damage to critical infrastructure from natural hazards. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Computer Science, Economics, Engineering, and Physics.

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Risk, Economics, & Decision Sciences: applications of advanced methods and techniques to support decision making; quantitative analysis. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Biology, Chemistry, Agriculture, Computer Science, Economics, Mathematics, and Engineering.

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Social & Behavioral Sciences: social and behavioral analyses of terrorist threats; community preparedness, response and recovery from catastrophic events; economic assessments of terrorism and catastrophic events; and economic and mathematical decision models of terrorist behavior. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Engineering, Health Sciences, Economics, and Psychology.

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Transportation Security: applications of advanced methods and techniques to support decision making; quantitative analysis; improving the Nation’s preparedness in the event of a high consequence natural or man-made disaster, and developing best practices to alleviate the event’s effects. The following are HS-STEM disciplines that could be necessary to support research associated with this DHS S&T area: e.g. Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, Mathematics, Physics, Economics, and Business Supply Chain.

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