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Projects


Computational Science and Engineering Division - Multi-Projects

Members: Tasha Gable, Ashley Jones, Jonathan Johnson, Samim Jafri,
and Derek Free
Mentors: Kathy Fischer, Richard Reid, Bhaduri Budhendra, David Hetrick,
Lee Hively, and Thomas Potok

We explored many of the programs here at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Some of the areas that have been explored include the Chemical/Biological area, the OSCAR program (Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign), SensorNet, and many other interesting sites. Almost all the places that have been visited can tie together under one topic that plays an important part in today's society, Homeland Security.
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Robotic Systems and Engineering Development - 1

Members: Melody Cotterill, Bryce Ingalls, Leanna Jaiyeola, Caleb Mitchell, Joanna Moye, and Juliana Smith
Mentor: Brad Weil

Project participants were to build a robot that would complete a specific course. The course consisted of obstacles that needed to be overcome. Students needed to master their teamwork skills and learn the problem solving process. Participants formed design teams and chose roles such as project leader, researcher, mechanical designer, or programmer. Teams needed to build, program and test their own robot capable of completing as many obstacles as possible. The team robot was constructed from building elements, motors and sensors contained in a kit of parts called the LEGO Mindstorms Robotics Invention System.
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Robotic Systems and Engineering Development - 2

Members: Michael Campell, Colleen Lanham, Alejandra Melton, James Mitchell, Dennis Mitchell, and Sunni Stewart
Mentor: Brad Weil

Project participants were to build a robot that would complete a specific course. The course consisted of obstacles that needed to be overcome. Students needed to master their teamwork skills and learn the problem solving process. Participants formed design teams and chose roles such as project leader, researcher, mechanical designer, or programmer. Teams needed to build, program and test their own robot capable of completing as many obstacles as possible. The team robot was constructed from building elements, motors and sensors contained in a kit of parts called the LEGO Mindstorms Robotics Invention System.
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Website Design and Development

Members: Ashley Bens, Whitney Buterbaugh, Dean Milner, Eric Stough, Brittaney Tate, and Quartrail Tucker
Mentor: Cynthia Latham assisted by Jim Pearce

The participants learned how to use the power of the Internet to publish the information and images that resulted from the various fieldwork activities of the other groups. The students learned the steps required to create a website design from scratch and to actually construct the website according to that design. These steps include defining objectives and goals of the site, organizing the structure, devising the look and feel of the site, writing text, gathering information and photos, and utilizing and understanding HTML and graphics applications to create the site.
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Building Technology

Members: Bonnie Aker, Danielle Casey, Andrea Cooke, Alison Coons, and
Timothy Hayes
Mentor: William Miller

Teachers participating in the 2003 Appalachian Regional Commission mentoring program conducted roof, wall, window, insulation, moisture, ventilation and renewable energy studies during their six days spent with the Building Envelope Group of the Engineering Science & Technology division. The Building Envelope group provided technical mentoring support which helped participating teachers identify innovative building technologies and practices that can contribute to the energy efficiency and reliability of new and existing residential buildings. Each mentor provided an assignment for the teachers to learn the effect of the technology on building performance. Lessons learned by the teachers were documented in Energy-10 to identify the most cost-effective, energy-saving measures for residential buildings. The teachers formulated and simulated a base case residential house using Energy-10 and compared its performance to their best combination of energy-efficient strategies identified while reviewing ongoing roof, wall, window, insulation, moisture, ventilation and renewable energy studies.
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Calibration and Testing of Neutron Focusing Mirrors

Members: Cathy Daugherty, Brande Flaitz, Pamela Goidell, Jared Rastoka, and Sheila Stevenson
Mentors: Judy Pang and Rodney McKee
Experiment Assistants: F.J Walker, Curt Billman, and Gene Ice

This group preliminary worked on a project to calibrate Kirkpatrick-Baez neutron super mirrors for neutron micro focusing. The ultimate goal of the project was to condense neutron beams for studies of small samples. The group tested the prototype in the laboratory by focusing laser beams and collecting data to help them find the optimal focus range of the mirror system. The experience has given them a chance to participate in the type of activities that engage real researchers, using tools, such as the K-B mirrors and low power lasers, which are not available in the classroom. In continuance with using the Kirkpartick-Baez super mirror system to reflect neutron beams, they were in the process of micro-fabricating a photolithography of gold onto a silicon substrate. These will then be used to aid in the calibration of X-ray beams and in the future a neutron beam source.
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EcoLab

Members: Jon Lundy, Dana Smith, Millicent Stoneking, and Stephanie Vaughn
Mentors: Lenell Woods and Kaye Johnson

The EcoLab was an invitation to study the basic chemistry of any surface water body: stream, lake, river, creek, bay, marsh, swamp, pond or even aquariums. The material covered in the EcoLab was general enough to apply to any of these forms of surface water. The environmental changes demonstrated in the EcoLab experiments produced more dramatic results in freshwater than salt water. The teachers measured the flow rate of the body of water, took samples of the water and ran tests to determine the quality of the water. The water sample was divided into four different variables (i.e., no sunlight & plants, fish, sunlight and plants, nutrients to simulate fertilizer runoff) and the teachers studied their variables throughout the week and compared them to the control and the end of the week. The teachers measured the amount of ammonia, nitrates, dissolved oxygen, iron, copper and pH in the water samples. They also measured the temperature of the water. The teachers measured the samples for a period of five days and analyzed the data. The lab can be extended to include the study of invertebrates, the riparian section around the body of water, pollutants and the habitat.
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Have any questions? Ask Martha Hammond